Daily Archives: 26 February 2020

Images of Newtok

Sticking the landing:

Newtok, Alaska: That wasn’t a landing, as much as it was an arrival.

IMG_3175.jpeg

When we landed in Newtok, the little airstrip was a hive of activity.  Two small planes were parked at one end of the runway, with people, gear and supplies being quickly unloaded in the -20F degree air.  Two men with four wheelers offered us rides on the back to the heart of the village: The School.

In the summer, Newtok is a village of boardwalks.  The entire village is sinking into the tundra, with the melting of the permafrost, and many of the boardwalks will be under water when break up arrives.

Today though, the ground is frozen firm, and the village is encased in snow.

image_asset_60979.png

The Yup’ik village of Newtok, which roughly translates to “rustling of grass”, first saw a permanent settlement in 1949, although the ancestors of the residents have lived in the area for over 2000 years.  By 1958, the BIA had built a school.  The location was determined because it was the farthest up river that barges could bring in supplies.

The Ninglick River has been taking dozens of feet of shoreline annually by erosion, leaving much of Newtok balancing precariously.  A new location for the village has been staked out 9 miles away at Mertarvik, which roughly translates as “good water” from Yup’ik.  Approximately one third of the village moved across the river onto higher ground this past autumn.

IMG_3168.jpeg

The church of Newtok

The church was empty, as the priest travels from village to village.  The sunset is glowing through the windows on the opposite side.

IMG_3167.jpeg

Go Jaegers!

We spent a lot of time in the school, as it acted as a community center for the village.  Everyone seemed to go through the school at some point.  The teachers, administration, and students were all very welcoming, and I thoroughly enjoyed the interaction.

IMG_3186.jpeg

Bear, aka Dimitri

This little guy became our constant companion and guide.  Bear would see us out walking from across the village, and he’d come running for us at a gallop.  We often had a pack of village dogs following us, and competing for our attention when we were out & about.  Like all the residents of Newtok, they were incredibly gracious hosts.