Tag Archives: snow

High water on the Copper

Flooding along Alaska’s famed Copper River has been pretty severe this spring. The heavy snows have begun to melt, and the Copper, like many other rivers throughout the state, are at flood stage.

The video above shows a home floating down the Copper River after the bank eroded and gave way. As many as six other homes are in danger of being swept downstream.


A snowy Denali National Park

The view across Denali National Park at the end of May, 2022

In the 99 years of record keeping within Denali National Park, the winter of 2021-22 was the record setter. 176 inches of snow fell at park headquarters this past winter, breaking the 174″ of 1970-71.

As of May 15, there were still 33″ of snow on the ground at the park’s headquarters, far above average for this late in the season.

It’s been a tough winter for wildlife, particularly moose, who have had to fight the deep drifts. Both moose and bears have been traveling on the park road, so traffic has been limited past Sable Pass. Bicyclists normally can travel up & down the park road, but with the stressed wildlife, that will remain limited until the snow melts.

The shuttle bus will only be traveling as far as Pretty Rocks, due to the road collapse from the melting ice formation.

The park’s visitor center will be open for the first time since 2019, and the park’s sled dog kennel will also be open for tours. 2022 is the 100th anniversary for the Denali Park Sled Dog Kennel.


Rising waters

The community of Manley Hot Springs

No one was surprised to hear the National Weather Service issuing flood watches and warnings throughout Alaska’s Interior this past weekend. With a Top Ten Snowfall this past winter, we have been readying for the coming melt.

Manley Hot Springs is one of the first communities to come under water. An ice dam on the Tanana River has caused water to back up into Manley. As of Sunday morning, as many as 75 residents in the lower areas of the town had been displaced, many of which were seeking shelter in the Manley Hot Springs Lodge.

Reports have ice starting to move on the Tanana, which would alleviate the flooding.

Manley under water from the Tanana River

A Flood Watch had been issued for Eagle on the Yukon River, as well as Hughes on the Koyukuk. Ice now appears to be moving on both rivers and those two watches have been cancelled as of Sunday afternoon.

Temperatures for the coming week are going to dip down into the low to mid 40’s F for highs, with a (relatively) rare chance of May snow for Fairbanks. Even though we are all ready for summer and its warmer temps, a slow melt would be a good thing.


Denali National Park & Preserve

National Parks Week: Day Four

Looking down on Muldrow Glacier; Image credit: Hudson Stuck

The image was taken in 1913, when Walter Harper, Hudson Stuck, Harry Karstens, and Robert Tatum trekked their way to Denali’s summit. It was Harper who became the first known individual to stand on the summit of North America’s highest peak.


Hard to beat good camo

Comic Loose Parts by Dave Blazek

Northern Sunlight

A normal day in Utqiagvik, Alaska

Utqiagvik, the community formerly known as Barrow, now has more daylight and civil twilight than Miami, Florida on the Summer Solstice.

We are also closer, in the northern hemisphere, to the upcoming Summer Solstice, than we are to the previous Winter Solstice. That calls for a toast. Cheers.


A new Champ

Brent Saas and his team mushes into Nome

Brent Saas, in his seventh Iditarod, won the 2022 race. He crossed under the famed burled arch in Nome early Tuesday morning. Local temps were hovering around zero. It was the first Iditarod win for Sass. Five time winner, Dallas Seavey came in second. A win would have given Seavey a record sixth title, but Sass, who ran a phenomenal race, held on for the victory.

Brent Sass, and his lead dogs Slater and Morello, after winning the Iditarod

Brent Sass first ran the Iditarod in 2012, winning rookie of the year when he came in 13th. Sass has won the Yukon Quest three times.

Images credit: Alaska Public Media


A bit of snow


Hoarding Daylight

Moose tracks

It’s still winter in Alaska: it was -10F on Sunday morning, and expected to drop to -20F Monday night, but the switch has been flipped. The sled dogs are running, the ice carvings are on display, and the aurora shows itself almost nightly.

March in Alaska.

Already, we have over 13 hours of visible light during the day, and our days are gaining length by almost 7 minutes with each spin of the Earth.

March is a beautiful time in Alaska’s Interior.


“Mt Edgecumb”

“Mt Edgecumb, Sitka”, water color on paper by Elsie Burkman; 1969