Monthly Archives: February 2018

International Polar Bear Day

Today, February 27, is International Polar Bear Day. I have only seen a polar bear once in the “wild”, when visiting a client at Prudhoe Bay. Two bears had come in for a stroll through the parking lot. I have posted those pictures on here in the past. Today, since it is the bears’ day, I figured I would go with a more natural photo. Unfortunately, I could not find the photographer’s name, although she/he certainly deserve credit for such a beautiful shot.

SAFETY NOTE: It should be noted, that hugging a polar bear, on this day, or any other, is highly hazardous and not recommended by the author, or any representative of Circle to Circle.


Wes Montgomery

Music Monday:

Switching it up a bit, with the great jazz guitarist Wes Montgomery.


It winds from Chicago to LA…

Music Monday:

A special dedication, going out to Barn-Stormin’ Andy of Osky. My partner in crime on The Second Floor.
The hooligans never got the best of us


Horse (Snow)Shoes

Since I’ve been doing a lot of snowshoeing this winter, I thought I’d share this historic photograph from the Wrangell-St Elias NP&P archives. Horses have never been the most practical mode of transport over Alaska’s varied terrain, and there was no word on how much the winter shoes helped support the horse in this case. Still, it is a unique fashion statement.


Out on snowshoes


Camera: Leica M3; Film: Kodak T-Max 100

A cold, but bright day in the back 400 on snowshoes.


Boreal Owl

I stopped by one of my regular customers this morning, and found myself eyeball to eyeball with this little Boreal Owl. I had walked right by it, and only noticed it after I rang the door bell, and was waiting to be let in.

I’m pretty sure it’s a Boreal, and a small one at that. The Alaska DNR says that they can grow to 10″ long, with this one being in the 7-8″ range, by guestimate.

Around six inches of snow fell overnight, and the wind finally started to blow, knocking the snow off the tree limbs in small avalanches. No doubt, the little owl found the covered walkway to be well protected from the wind and falling snow.

The owl’s head would turn as I walked back and forth from my truck to the house and back again, but for the most part, it paid me only marginal interest. When I left, it was still perched on the carving that hangs on the wall.

Taking a few steps back, gives you an idea how small the owl is. Unfortunately, the only camera I had with me was my cell phone.


Theodore Roosevelt Bridge


Camera: Leica M3; Film: Kodak TMax 100