Tag Archives: driving

Battling the Prince of Darkness

The Rover regains its sight

In late August, I had to make a run to the airport to pick up a pair of travelers. The flight landed around midnight, and I meant to hop in the Land Rover to go and pick them up. As luck, and Lucas would have it, The Rover had no headlights.

I debated. It was still light enough to technically see, even at midnight, but was it a wise decision(?). In other words, would I get a ticket if stopped by a police officer.

I took other transportation. I probably would have made it.

I should, i.e. need, to replace the wiring from headlight to taillight, but like this weekend, I found an issue, not necessarily the issue, and the vehicle has headlights once again, so I moved on.

The Ghost of Joseph Lucas is enough to put the fear of copper in anyone. Joseph Lucas is the founder of Lucas Electrics, which “powers” many of the classic British vehicles. I don’t know about Jaguar owners, but in Land Rover circles, Joseph is known as The Prince of Darkness. Joseph started out as an oil lamp manufacturer. I think he hit his peak with whale oil.

Lucas still holds the patent for the short circuit.


Calvin Kline hits Fairbanks

A CK billboard along the Richardson Highway in Fairbanks

The new billboard along the Richardson Highway, here in Fairbanks, grabbed my attention immediately, when I drove by it.

For most places in the U.S. that would not be the case, but in Alaska, billboards are illegal. In fact, my immediate, internal response when I first saw it was: “Well, that’s illegal.”

We do not have billboards in Alaska; we’d rather look at the scenery and wildlife. So Alaskans passed the Prohibition of Billboards Initiative in 1988, and reaffirmed it again in the late 1990’s. Alaskans were overwhelmingly in favor of the ban, with 72.38% of the voters agreeing that we did not want to see billboards along our highways. I can’t even fathom how bad it would be between here and Denali Park. There would be no glitter in Glitter Gulch.

My guess is that CK knew all about the ban from the get-go, and that the additional media coverage, at least locally, has done as much for the brand as the actual billboard. I don’t think Carhartts is worried about market share in Fairbanks.

Although, I am firmly in favor of the billboard ban, I was thrilled to see local native, and Fairbanks resident Quannah Chasinghorse Potts, become a part of the recent Calvin Kline CK One campaign: There’s not just one race here in America. A sincere congrats to her.

As for the billboard, the owners have 30 days to take it down, or the State DOT will do it for them, and no doubt charge for the effort. I think CK should respect Alaska voters and take the billboard down, then come up with a new way to advertise the campaign, with Ms Potts, and place the advert elsewhere and in another form. I’m sure they can get creative; no doubt they make enough to travel outside of the rectangle.

Just don’t block the view of the moose.


Moose Crossing

Guest Photographer:

Photo credit: NMT

Driving into Denali National Park one day this August, we were forced to stop for one of the locals. I love how small that car looks.

P.S. Roof top tent


Ness Church Cemetery

Litchfield, Minnesota


Toad River, British Columbia

Film Friday:

The Toad River Lodge

Camera: Kodak 66; Film: Kodak 120, Tri-X 400


Bridal Veil Falls

Keystone Canyon; Valdez, Alaska


AlCan Stop

Film Friday:

Camera: Kodak 66; Film: Kodak 120, Ektar 100


Denali peeks through

Just the peak of Denali showing itself on the left

Denali was out on Sunday, making for the first time I’ve seen the mountain this summer. The picture was taken from the Northern viewpoint along the Parks Highway.


Devil’s Tower

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Alaska

A Pandemic Roadtrip: Final Installment

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Crossing the border

After the strip down search my car suffered getting into Canada, I wasn’t sure what to expect from the U.S. Border Patrol.  The officer was professional and to the point, and after a quick exchange of identification, I was welcomed back home.  For the first time, I was asked for my car’s registration, but other than that, everything was par for the course.

3651 miles traveled.

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Back on Alaska roads