Tag Archives: B&W

Totem House

Totem House, Hoonah, Alaska; circa 1915

Kennecott Mines National Historic Landmark

National Parks Week: Day Five

Kennecott

Within Wrangell-St Elias National Park is the old mill town of Kennecott. In 1900, two prospectors, “Tarantula” Jack Smith and Clarence Warner, spotted a green patch in the hills, but thought it was an odd location for a meadow. It turned out to be malachite mixed with chalcocite (copper glance). It was the beginning of the Bonanza Claim.

Kennecott Mine in its heyday

A group called the Alaska Syndicate, which included Daniel Guggenhiem and J.P. Morgan, was formed. Kennecott had five mines: Bonanza, Jumbo, Mother Lode, Erie, and Glacier. Between 1909 and 1938 over 4.6 million tons of ore was processed, which produced 1.183 billion pounds of copper.

Gilahina Trestle Bridge, CR&NW RR; Camera: Rolleiflex

To haul the ore out of the remote location of Kennecott, operations needed a railroad. Michael Heney received the right of way up to the Copper River, and started to build the Copper Line in 1906. Meanwhile, Myron Rogers received a four year contract from Guggenheim to build the Northwestern Line, which he started in 1907. That same year, Heney sold the Copper Line to the Alaska Syndicate.

The Million Dollar Bridge

The Miles Glacier Bridge, more commonly known as the Million Dollar Bridge, was one of many obstacles that the Kennecott Corporation faced in building the railroad. The bridge, completed in 1910, came with a whopping $1.4 million dollar price tag. A small nugget when compared with the $100 million profits the mine provided investors.

The last spike, a copper spike, was driven on 29 March 1911, and the first load of copper ore soon traveled down the tracks. The Copper River and Northwestern Railroad, also known locally & affectionately, as the Can’t Run & Never Will, was in operation.

Looking up at the CR&NW

Today, the road to McCarthy and Kennecott is the old CR&NW railroad bed. For years, the drive out to Kennecott was an adventure in avoiding railroad spikes. Many a tire was punctured by an old leftover spike from the Copper River & Northwestern.

I have been out to Kennecott many times. Currently, the mine ruins are undergoing a stabilization. Some buildings, like the post office, are being restored, but for the most part, the National Park Service is just trying to keep them from complete collapse. The new roofs on the buildings are obviously a great start.


Daddy Longlegs attack Armory

Arachnids atop the Seattle Center Armory; Artwork bt Marlin Peterson

“Eastern Part of the Brooks Range”

Arctic National Wildlife Refuge; Silver Gelatin Photograph

This stunning image is from Brazilian photographer SebastiĆ£o Salgado. Taken in 2009 for his Genesis project. Such a powerful image of the Refuge.


27 March 1964

Anchorage, Alaska after the 9.2 Good Friday Earthquake


Finding Endurance

Ernest Shackleton’s Endurance

A team of modern day adventurists and scientists used undersea drones to locate the famed Endurance. The ship was last seen 106 years ago.

Captained by Ernest Shackleton, the Endurance was caught in sea ice off the Antarctic Peninsula in 1915. The crew was forced to abandon the ship before it was crushed by the sea ice, and sank. Shackleton then led his crew on a miraculous 800 mile journey to safety.

The Endurance, caught in the sea ice off Antarctica; Photo by Frank Hurley, 1915

The Endurance was found approximately 4 miles from the position last taken by Shackleton, almost 10,000 feet below the surface of the Weddell Sea. The ship is “in a brilliant state of preservation”, which did not come as a surprise due to the cold water temps and lack of wood eating marine organisms. The name Endurance can clearly be seen on the stern, as well as a five pointed star, which dates back to when the vessel was known as Polaris.


A bit of snow


“Song of the Huskies”

Print by Fred Machetanz; 1967


Alaska Travel: 1910

A musher and dog team outside Nome, Alaska

Katmai, Alaska; circa 1912

Katmai after the Novarupta Eruption; Photo was taken 9 weeks after the eruption

The eruption of Novarupta on 6 June 1912 was the largest of the 20th Century. The village of Katmai was destroyed in the eruption, buried under as much as 18 inches of volcanic ash.