Tag Archives: film

Traveling the Chatanika Spur

October is American Archives Month:

1920’s travel along the narrow gauge rail of what was originally the Tanana Valley Railroad. By 1920, the TVRR had been bought out and this section renamed the Chatanika Branch. In 1923 it all became part of the Alaska Railroad.


Kennecott Mine

Film Friday:

A visit to Kennecott Copper Mine

Camera: Kodak 66; Film: Kodak 120, Ektar 100


Play ball!

Film Friday:

Winter Baseball League in Fairbanks; Photo credit: University of Alaska Archives

Fun Fact

Death Valley logbook on Thursday

Last Thursday, Death Valley had a high temp of 128F. That was still closer to freezing, than the record low for Fairbanks at -66F.

A chilly afternoon crossing the Goldstream Valley, from the magic of Leica.

Thanks to AlaskaWx for that little tidbit.


Happy Summer Solstice

The hike to Tolovana

The photo above, which I’ve posted on here before, was taken at midnight on a hike out to Tolovana Hot Springs. At the top of the pass, I took this photo, before dropping down into the hot springs. Most people trek out here in the winter months, by ski, dog sled or snowmachine. We hiked out in June, and it was a slog, but we had the springs to ourselves, which was an incredible few days. Very fond memories.

Fairbanks, in case anyone was curious, will see 21 hours and 49 minutes of daylight, with the rest of the 24 hours being filled in with civil twilight.

The camera, for the above photo, was an old Canon Canonet; the film I believe was Fuji, probably high speed.

May your days be long and filled with sunshine.

Happy Solstice


Sockeye salmon are being caught at the mouth of Resurrection Bay. Fishing should/hopefully improve over the coming weeks. Like every season, the Return of the Sockeye is an inexact science. Bristol Bay is expecting a great return, the Copper River, not so much. For the rest of us in-between? Time will tell.

For the past decade, my little group of salmon chasers have seen full freezers in odd years, and a battle to fill, in even years. I’m looking forward to seeing if that trend continues, as I have a near empty freezer.

Artwork by the ever talented, slightly twisted, and all-Alaskan: Ray Troll


In the weeds

Film Friday:

Forgotten One Ton

Camera: Polaroid 600 Land Camera; Film: Polaroid B&W 600


Welcome Back

Film Friday:

Ducks, geese, swans and cranes have all come back to the neighborhood. The back pond still has ice, although it’s looking more than a bit dodgy and should go out this weekend. The beaver is patrolling the edges, occasionally flushing a pair of mallards from the open water to the ice, where they stand patiently waiting for the open water to be beaver free. Even the gulls are back, swooping low over the pond’s edge looking for the perfect nesting spot.

Spring has indeed arrived in the Far North.

Camera: Leica M3; Film: Kodak 35mm, Ektar100


The return of the Sandhill Cranes

A pair of Sandhill Cranes surrounded by ducks and geese at Creamers Field

On Monday morning, when I was getting things ready for the day’s job, I heard the first Sandhill Crane calls of the season. Their ancient, rattling bugle echoed across the valley floor, and I stopped immediately to search for the source. It was a pair of cranes, and they flew in low as they announced their return to the valley.

By Tuesday morning, the sounds of the sandhills could be heard from all directions in the valley.

The photo was taken last spring at Creamers Field Waterfowl Refuge before the birds spread out across the state and beyond.

Camera: Leica M3; Film: Kodak 35mm, Ektar 100

Listen to the sounds of the sandhill cranes


May the 4th be with You

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Family photo courtesy of Land Rover

*Cries of dismay can be heard from current LR model owners…