Tag Archives: travel

It winds from Chicago to LA…

Music Monday:

A special dedication, going out to Barn-Stormin’ Andy of Osky. My partner in crime on The Second Floor.
The hooligans never got the best of us


Horse (Snow)Shoes

Since I’ve been doing a lot of snowshoeing this winter, I thought I’d share this historic photograph from the Wrangell-St Elias NP&P archives. Horses have never been the most practical mode of transport over Alaska’s varied terrain, and there was no word on how much the winter shoes helped support the horse in this case. Still, it is a unique fashion statement.


Theodore Roosevelt Bridge


Camera: Leica M3; Film: Kodak TMax 100


Sedona Automotive


Gypsy Hiker in Kathmandu

The Gypsy Hiker is now in Nepal. Since the name Kathmandu always stirs up images, I wanted to share his blogpost on his visit there. In a previous post, the Gypsy Hiker was invited to a local wedding in Kathmandu. The best times come about unexpectedly, when traveling, and I have also been shown incredible hospitality, by complete strangers, when on the road.

via Spending two days with local Nepalese! #Kathmandu — A boy around the world


Federals Have Won * By Costing Less To Run


1948 Federal Truck Model 16M

The Federal Motor Truck Company started as Bailey Motor Truck in 1910. It’s final truck was sold in the United States in 1959.

In all, over 160,000 Federals were manufactured. As of 2004, there are 183 known survivors.


1948 Sales literature for the M16 Federal truck


Snow Day!

One of the perks to being self-employed in Alaska, is that we can blame suppliers for being late, when we just want to head out into the woods… or streams… or lakes…

We’ve had a little bit of everything this week, as far as weather goes. Warm temps, freezing rain, followed by a nice dumping of very wet snow. A solid eight inches at my cabin. I could have wrapped up the job, but there was no rush, as I’m already ahead of schedule, and the only thing remaining was replacing a special order light fixture. Besides, it was obvious that the snowshoes were being neglected.

I laced up the mukluks, and strapped on the Faber snowshoes, and headed out into the back four hundred for an afternoon in the fresh snow.

The only sound I heard came from the crunching of my steps. When I stopped moving, silence hung in the air. Not a brooding silence, but a peaceful, all is right in the world kind of silence, as long as one leaves the TV off.

There is very little to report on my romp. No people, no dog teams, and only one moose. A young one has been clinging to the cabin area, and I have yet to see the mother. It’s a small moose, probably one of last year’s calves. Which is highly unusual to not see signs of the cow, but even the small hoof prints on the trail are missing any adult moose tracks alongside. With this latest snowfall, the calf’s legs are not long enough to keep its belly out of the snow, when it goes off trail. I could tell, by the way it was staring, that the moose was jealous of my snowshoes.