Tag Archives: medium format

Yukon Quest Start

Film Friday: 

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Camera: Rolleiflex 3.5MX; Film: Kodak 35mm, Tri-X 400

 

 

 


On the shoreline of the Ninglick River

Film Friday:

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Newtok, Alaska: After the storm

Camera: Rolleiflex 3.5MX; Film: Kodak 120, Tri-X 400 

 


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Newtok Post Office

The lean in the post office building is quite visible here.  This was the day after the storm, and when we first walked by, you could not see the building under the snowdrift.  On our return, a couple of hours later, the front had mostly been shoveled, but the front steps and door were still encased in snow.

Camera: Rolleiflex 3.5MX; Film: Kodak 120, Tri-X 400 

 


“Bear”

Film Friday:

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Bear, aka Dimitri

The dog “Bear” quickly captured the hearts of our little troupe.  He came to us at full gallop whenever he saw us out and about in the village.  At one point, I had been inside a home talking to the home owners, and when I came out, Bear was curled up in the arctic entry, right in front of the door.  Bear was with me the rest of the day.

Bear was our mascot, guide, companion and ice breaker, all rolled up in one furry package.  The locals all thought we were crazy: We either had a pack of dogs following us, or a pack of kids.  Often we had a mixed following of each.

One of us even renamed him “Dimitri”, although he was obviously a “Bear”.  There were some whispers of a dognapping, questions were asked about the dog’s owners.  No one could tell us who owned the friendliest of village dogs.  Finally, we asked one of the students at the school, who we saw every day, and who joined us for meals, whenever he could.

“Who owns this dog?”

“That’s Bear, he’s my dog.”

Of course he was!  What a perfect match.  Bear could have belonged to no one else.

Camera: Rolleiflex 3.5MX; Film: Kodak 120, Tri-X 400 

 


Through the Frosty Looking Glass

Film Friday:

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Camera: Rolleiflex 3.5MX; Film: Kodak 120, T-Max 100


Centennial Hall

Film Friday:

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Camera: Rolleiflex 3.5MX; Film: Kodak 120, Ektar 100


Empty Dog Lot

Film Friday:

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Camera: Rolleiflex 3.5MX; Film: Kodak 120, Ektar 100

 


ALSIB Air Route

Fim Friday:

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Alaska – Siberia Monument

Camera: Rolleiflex 3.5MX; Film: Kodak 120, T-Max 100

 


Cabin in the trees

Film Friday:

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Camera: Rolleiflex 3.5MX; Film: Kodak 120, Ektar 100


Lend-Lease Monument

 

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Camera: Rolleiflex 3.5MX; Film: Kodak 120, TMax100

The Lend-Lease Monument is located in Griffin Park, downtown Fairbanks, near Golden Heart Plaza, alongside the Chena River.

The Lend-Lease Act was originally passed in March 1941, with the Soviet Union being added to the program in October of the same year.  The Northwest Staging Route, from the mainland of the U.S. through Canada and into Alaska, was extended into the Soviet Union with the Alaska-Siberian Airway (ALSIB).

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Map of ALSIB; cell phone photo

Planes were ferried from locations like Buffalo, NY; Minneapolis, MN; St Louis, MO; and Oklahoma City, OK to Great Falls, MT.  Airfields were carved out of the wilderness from Montana through Canada and on to Ladd Field in Fairbanks.  Most airfields were built 100 miles apart, with the longest being between Fort Nelson, BC and Liard River, which was 140 miles.  The Alaska Highway would soon be completed linking the airfields together by road.

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Camera: Rolleiflex 3.5MX; Film: Kodak 120, TMax100

The first Soviet pilots landed in Nome on 14 August 1942.  The Soviets took over the aircraft at either Ladd Field in Fairbanks or at Nome, then flew across the Bering Strait to Krasnoyarsk in Siberia.

Over 8000 aircraft flew through Ladd Field in Fairbanks on their way to the Soviet Union.  Between October 1941 and the end of May 1945 the U.S. provided the USSR with nearly a half-million vehicles other than aircraft, 2 million tons of gasoline and oil, and close to 4.5 million tons of food.  Of the 8000 aircraft, 133 were lost.  The average time to ferry an aircraft to the Soviet Union was 33 days.

Some of the aircraft ferried:

The Bell P-39 Airacobra, followed by the P-63 Kingcobra its successor, the Curtiss P-40 Warhawk, and Rebublic P-47 Thunderbolt.  Bombers ferried included the Douglas A-20 Havoc and North American’s B-25 Mitchell.  Most of the transports ferried were the Douglas C-47 Skytrain.

“The structure of world peace cannot be the work of one man, or one party, or one nation… it must be a peace which rests on the cooperative effort of the whole world.”  

Franklin Delano Roosevelt