Tag Archives: kodak tri-x400

On the Sioux Trail: Ness Church

U.S. – Dakota War of 1862; Part XI

Ness Church, Litchfield, Minnesota; in 2020

On August 17, 1862, four young Dakota warriors killed five settlers near Acton, Minnesota. The killings would ignite the war between the Dakotas’ and the United States military, but tensions had been brewing long before that August day in 1862. The bodies of those five settlers would be brought, to what is now Litchfield, and buried at Ness Church.

I visited the church and the surrounding cemetery with one of C-to-C’s sponsors, when I was back in Minnesota this past spring.

Ness Monument to the fallen settlers

In the back corner of the cemetery, close to the rows of corn, stands a monument. Buried underneath, in one grave, are the first five victims of the U.S. -Dakota War: Robinson Jones, Viranus Webster, Howard Baker, Ann (Baker) Jones, and Clara Wilson.

The Ness Monument was erected on 13 September 1878, by the State of Minnesota. It is the third oldest monument in the state.

The original Ness Church, circa 1858

In 1970, the church & cemetery were listed officially, as a Minnesota Historical Site.

The church was founded by Ole Halverson Ness and his wife Margit, who arrived in the area in 1856. Ole Ness was a member of the Acton burial party.

Also buried in the cemetery is Andreas Olson, another victim of the U.S. -Dakota War. Olson was killed on 22 September 1862.

Historic Ness Church

The current church was built by settlers in 1874, a dozen years after the start of the U.S. – Dakota War. The church is said to be haunted by both Sioux Indians and the five settlers, in particular the young girl, Annie. The church historical society denies any haunting, although that has not stopped self-proclaimed ghost hunters from breaking into the church.

I witnessed no paranormal activity when I was there, but I did find the cemetery to be a very solemn place.

Camera for B&W photos: Kodak 66; Film: Kodak 120, Tri-X400


Newtok School

Film Friday:

000365000008_298339_1585366405_lg.jpeg

After the blizzard

Camera: Widelux VI; Film: Kodak 35mm, Tri-X400 

 

 

 


Yukon Quest Start

Film Friday: 

000435790003.jpeg

000435790004.jpg

000435790007.jpeg

Camera: Rolleiflex 3.5MX; Film: Kodak 35mm, Tri-X 400

 

 

 


On the shoreline of the Ninglick River

Film Friday:

000435790009_291809_1583304412_lg.jpeg

Newtok, Alaska: After the storm

Camera: Rolleiflex 3.5MX; Film: Kodak 120, Tri-X 400 

 


99559

000435800002_291809_1583304422_lg.jpeg

Newtok Post Office

The lean in the post office building is quite visible here.  This was the day after the storm, and when we first walked by, you could not see the building under the snowdrift.  On our return, a couple of hours later, the front had mostly been shoveled, but the front steps and door were still encased in snow.

Camera: Rolleiflex 3.5MX; Film: Kodak 120, Tri-X 400 

 


“Bear”

Film Friday:

000435800003_291809_1583304424_lg.jpeg

Bear, aka Dimitri

The dog “Bear” quickly captured the hearts of our little troupe.  He came to us at full gallop whenever he saw us out and about in the village.  At one point, I had been inside a home talking to the home owners, and when I came out, Bear was curled up in the arctic entry, right in front of the door.  Bear was with me the rest of the day.

Bear was our mascot, guide, companion and ice breaker, all rolled up in one furry package.  The locals all thought we were crazy: We either had a pack of dogs following us, or a pack of kids.  Often we had a mixed following of each.

One of us even renamed him “Dimitri”, although he was obviously a “Bear”.  There were some whispers of a dognapping, questions were asked about the dog’s owners.  No one could tell us who owned the friendliest of village dogs.  Finally, we asked one of the students at the school, who we saw every day, and who joined us for meals, whenever he could.

“Who owns this dog?”

“That’s Bear, he’s my dog.”

Of course he was!  What a perfect match.  Bear could have belonged to no one else.

Camera: Rolleiflex 3.5MX; Film: Kodak 120, Tri-X 400 

 


Maison a Machicoulis

The French Castle; Fort Niagara

Camera: Leica M3; Film: Kodak 35mm, Tri-X400


Father Millet Cross

In the winter of 1687, the men stationed at Fort Niagara were overwhelmed by disease and starvation. Of the 100 men stationed at the garrison, only 12 would survive that brutal winter.

Father Pierre Millet, a Jesuit missionary, was a member of the rescue party that arrived at the fort in the spring of 1688. Father Millet erected an 18 foot wooden cross in honor of the men who perished.

In 1825, President Calvin Coolidge named the 18 square foot section surrounding the cross a national monument. It was the smallest national monument ever named in the U.S.. At the monument dedication, the original wooden cross was replaced by a bronze version, which still stands in its place.

In 1949, monument status was abolished by Congress, and the memorial was transferred to the State of New York, to be a part of Fort Niagara State Park.

Camera: Leica M3; Film: Kodak 35mm, Tri-X400