Tag Archives: salmon

The end of the run…

Tundra, by Chad Carpenter


Bear Glacier

Bear Glacier of Resurrection Bay


Fishing Resurrection Bay


Alaska Wild Salmon Day

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Alaska’s annual day to celebrate all things salmon, is still on, but it’s going virtual this year.  No salmon grilling open to the public this year, but you can always grill up some Alaskan sockeye in the privacy of your own backyard.

Cheers


Salmonfest 2020

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Salmonfest is an annual event here in Alaska.  This year, even those Outside can take part in the festivities, as the music festival will be streamed.

The event takes on additional urgency, as Alaskans overwhelmingly protest the fast tracking of the massive Pebble Mine at the headwaters of Bristol Bay.

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Brooks Falls Bear Cam

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Click to link below to visit the Katmai “Bear Cam”, from explore.org:

 

https://explore.org/livecams/brown-bears/brown-bear-salmon-cam-brooks-falls

 

 


Peter Pan

Film Friday:

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Peter Pan Seafoods; Naknek, Alaska

 

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Peter Pan Alley

 

Camera: Leica M3; Film: Fujichrome 35mm, Velvia 100

 


Alaska Roundup

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Naknek River; Camera: Leica M3, Film: Fujichrome Velvia 100

The North Slope village of Utqiagvik woke up to -20F degree temperatures on Wednesday morning.  That was a record low for the day for the village.  It was Utqiagvik’s first recording of a record low since 21 December 2007.  During that same time span, the village had set or tied 112 record high temperatures.

 

Alaska has started to “reopen” businesses throughout the state, with everyone seemingly holding their breath as it happens.  Travel restrictions into the state remain in place.  Restaurants are now able to seat to within 25% of capacity, and members at a table are supposed to be from the same household.

The Fairbanks Borough had seen two weeks go by without a new case of Covid-19, but that ended on Sunday with a case in North Pole.  Since then, North Pole has seen another diagnosed case.  The State had six new cases on Tuesday, for a total of 351.  228 individuals have recovered from Covid-19, and nine Alaskans have died from the virus.  Concerning, to me at least, is the first recorded cases in small, isolated, communities like Kodiak, Petersburg and Sitka after a long period of social distancing.

Fishing communities are still struggling with what to do for the summer season.  Valdez has decided to allow fishermen into town without any quarantine, where several smaller communities are demanding a quarantine.  The State of Alaska has agreed to allow fishermen to quarantine on their boats, although a realistic plan for that option remains elusive, considering most fly into these small communities, and air travel between towns not on the road system is off limits.  Travel between communities on the road system is now being allowed.

 

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Denali, and the Alaska Range

Tourism is all but scrapped for the 2020 season.  The two main cruise ship companies have written off Alaska for the year, and have even decided to keep their lodges and hotels closed until late spring 2021.

Denali National Park has now opened the Park Road to Mile 12.  As spring takes a stronger grip on the land, the Park will continue to open up more of the road as conditions allow.  Denali Park is also considering having additional road lotteries in 2020.  The lottery, which allows permit holders to drive well into the Park, where usually only busses are allowed, takes place in September.  Additional opportunities would be extremely welcome.  I’m thrilled with the idea, since the State is all but closed to Outside tourists this year.

No offense.

 

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Moose Crossing: Denali Highway at Tangle River

The Denali Highway, not to be confused with the Denali Park Road, is NOT open.  Yet, people keep getting stuck on the road between Cantwell and Paxson.  The Denali Highway, possibly the best drive in Alaska, is not maintained during the winter.  It is also not paved, which keeps the riffraff numbers down.  Or at least, the tour busses.

 


The Wolf

Alaska’s Big Five: 

 

The wolf, Canis lupus, has two distinct subspecies in Alaska.  Wolves in Southeast Alaska tend to be somewhat darker in color, and smaller physically than their northern Alaska counterparts.  Gray or black wolves are the most common, but pelts can be black to near white, with every shade of gray and tan in between.

The adult, male wolves of Interior Alaska normally weigh between 85-115 pounds.  Officially, the largest male wolf from Alaska was 179 lbs., although there have been claims of wolves over 200.  Females weigh 10-15 pounds less than the males, but rarely weigh more than 110 lbs.

Being social animals, wolves tend to live in packs.  On average a pack contains 6-8 wolves, although they can reach numbers much higher than that.  Moose and caribou make up the majority of their diet, although squirrels, rabbits, beaver, birds and fish will supplement their diet.  In Southeast Alaska, wolves primary prey are Sitka Black-tailed deer, mountain goat, beaver and salmon in season.

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Photo credit: Claire Dal Nogare, Flickr; Park Ranger Denali NP&P

Normally, one female in a pack has a liter of 4-6 pups in a year, on average.  Mortality rate is extremely high for the pups.  Few will make it to adulthood.  The lifespan for an Interior Alaskan wolf is 4-10 years, with the oldest known at 12 years old.

The wolf population is estimated to be between 7000-11,000 in Alaska, with a range that covers 85% of the state.  The population has never been declared threatened or endangered in Alaska.  Population density can vary greatly due to food source availability.

 

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The Brown Bear

Alaska’s Big Five:

Brown bears and grizzly are classified as the same species, with the grizzly considered a subspecies of the brown bear.  Brown bears are found along Alaska’s southern coastline, and are larger and live in higher densities than their inland grizzly counterparts.  The main advantage to coastal living, is the abundance of salmon as a food source.  The thicker vegetation and warmer climate of the southern coast also helps to give the brown bear the size edge.

The Kodiak brown bear is considered a unique subspecies from the brown & grizzly bear.  The Kodiaks have been isolated from mainland bears since the last ice age, or 12,000 years ago.

Brown bear cubs are born in January & February, usually as twins, but a litter of 1-4 cubs will occur.  Cubs usually emerge from the den in June.  Cubs have a survival rate of less than 50%, even with ferociously protective mothers.  Cubs will stay with their mother for 2-3 years.  The oldest known brown bear female was 39 years old, with the oldest known male at 38.  They can reach a weight of up to 1500 pounds.

Bears have an excellent sense of smell, and their eyesight & hearing is similar to humans.  They are excellent swimmers, and can run in bursts at 40 mph.

Currently, the Alaska brown bear population is around 32,000.  Which is 98% of the population in the United States, and 70% of the total North American population.

Kodiak Island has approximately 3500 bears, which makes for .7 bears per square mile.

By contrast, Alaska has approximately 100,000 black bears living in the state.