Tag Archives: wildlife

A day in the life…

What an Alaskan does upon returning from a month long sabbatical:


The view from Murphy Dome in black & white

Spend the morning fixing a customer’s plumbing problem. Like most plumbing problems, the job took two trips for fittings. Like all seemingly easy jobs, the customer added two new problems upon arrival, which had previously “slipped their mind”.

Buy potting soil.

Order flooring for a job that is two weeks away.

Buy tomato, pepper and squash plants.

Set up rain barrels for customer. Repair barrels where customer broke fittings. Reinstall water pump for garden from their pond. Let out their dog and chase it around the yard for a few minutes. Scratch their cat, so it doesn’t feel left out.

Stop by post office for mail, and Fred Meyer for just a few groceries.

Load truck with tools & materials for the next day’s job.

Uncover 1 ton work truck, that has been parked all winter. Hook up battery tender.

Take phone call from customer that wants me to hang several bird feeders. I caution customer that bird feed, especially black sunflower seeds, attracts bears, which she has had several visit in the past. Bird feeder job remains in limbo, as no decision was made.

Remove door to Rover hut for the season.

Plant lettuce.

Unplug refrigerator to defrost, before restocking. Plug in the Rover’s fridge to substitute for the next 24 hours.

Hike out to back 400 pond with Leica to check out the nesting trumpeter swans. The sun is wrong for good pictures, but the reward of watching the swimming pair from the brush is still high.

Haul out deck chairs; put away snowshoes.

Drop window awning, because cabin was 86 degrees when you returned home this afternoon.

Plant sunflowers.

Crack open a beer and grill a chicken breast and zucchini.

Contemplate that tomorrow is really going to be a hectic day.


A Return to the ‘Banks


The backyard at midnight

After a month Outside, I recently returned home to Fairbanks. As much as I enjoyed my travels, its nice to be back in Alaska. The days are long once again, the trumpeter swans are back swimming in the pond, and a moose greeted me in the yard within 15 minutes of my return.


Niagara Falls State Park


Welcome to Goat Island

Niagara Falls State Park is the oldest state park in the U.S.. The 400 plus acre park was established in 1885. I spent an entire afternoon exploring its trails and taking in the sights and sounds of The Falls.


Niagara Falls from the American side

Compared with last autumn, when I was on the other bank with the Curator & Brazil Lucas, the crowds this week were at a minimum. From the looks of things, May 1 is the date that things open up. The lower trails were still closed off, and few, if any attractions/facilities were open.


Statue dedicated to Nikola Tesla

In 1896, Nikola Tesla sent AC power, generated at The Falls, to Buffalo for the first time, proving to the world that it could be done. Previously, the DC power generated at The Falls could only be transmitted 100 yards.


Canadian Goose enjoying lunch at The Falls

It was a beautiful day to be out walking the trails. There is a trolley that runs through the park. You can get on and off as many times as you need during a day for $3. Not a bad price when you consider that a horse drawn carriage ride around The Falls in 1895 cost $1/hour.


Waterfall leading up to Three Sisters Islands

There is a pedestrian bridge and a vehicle bridge over to Goat Island. There are actually several islands at this end of the park, with foot bridges connecting them all. Some nice views of both sides of The Falls can be had from the island, with the Niagara River surrounding you.


Niagara from Goat Island

Four of the five Great Lakes drain into the Niagara River, before it flows into Lake Ontario. 75,750 gallons of water a second goes over American Falls and Bridal Veil Falls, and another 681,750 gallons per second over Horseshoe Falls.

It will take 50,000 years, due to erosion, for Niagara Falls to cease to exist.


Big Ice on the Block


“Kaktovik” – Polar bear on whale carcass, with raven looking on


“War Path”


“Hades’ Hound” – technically not a ‘big block’, but I’ve always had a soft spot for hellhounds

I have not been out to Ice Alaska of late, but with the warm temps, I’m sure most of the carvings are now stumps of ice sitting in puddles. In fact, the past two days have seen temps stay above freezing. That is the first time since recording began, that Fairbanks has seen consecutive days in March stay above 32F degrees.


Exxon Valdez: 30 Years Later


Exxon Baton Rouge attempts to offload crude oil from the Exxon Valdez, March 26, 1989; Photo credit: AP

30 years ago today, Alaskans awoke to the horrific news that the Exxon Valdez had inexplicably ran aground on Bligh Reef in Price William Sound. The tanker, bound for Long Beach, California, was carrying 53.1 million gallons of crude.


A crew attempts to clean the shoreline of Naked Island in Prince William Sound, April 2, 1989; Photo credit: Mike Blake/Rueters

11 million gallons of that crude spilled into Prince William Sound. At the time, the Valdez spill was the largest in U.S. waters. The Deep Horizon disaster has since eclipsed it. The Valdez spill is still considered one of the most devastating human caused environmental disasters.


A dead gray whale on the shore of Latoucha Island, April 9, 1989; Photo credit: John Gaps III/AP

The spill eventually impacted over 1300 miles of coastline. No booms or skimmers were readily available during the first 24 hours of the spill. Over 11,000 Alaskans converged on the area to help with the cleanup. In total, it has been estimated that far less than 10% of the spilled oil was cleaned from the surfaces that were impacted.


Bill Scheer of Valdez, Alaska on beach cleanup duty, April 13, 1989; Photo credit: John Gaps III/AP

Unfortunately, many of the chemicals used to disperse the crude did their own damage, killing plankton, which is the basis of the coastal marine food chain. Bacteria and fungus was also killed, which can facilitate the biodegradation of oil. In addition, the chemicals that were sprayed on the oil slick were not fully tested, and many workers on the cleanup crew were subject to agents that caused liver, kidney, lung, nervous system and blood disorders later in life.


A crude covered Red Necked Grebe from the Exxon Valdez spill, March 30, 1989; Photo credit: AP

The Exxon spill had an immediate effect on wildlife. Between 100,000 – 250,000 sea birds were killed in the weeks after the spill. At least 2800 sea otters, 12 river otters, 300 harbor seals, 247 bald eagles, 22 orcas, and an unknown number of salmon and herring were also destroyed.


The oil lingers. NMFS 2015 survey. Photo credit: NOAA

Surveys conducted in 2001 estimated that 60.62 tons (55,000 kg) of crude oil remained on the beaches of Prince William Sound.
In 2015, the National Marine Fisheries Service went back to the beaches that were impacted by the Exxon Valdez spill. They found patches of crude were still distributed under the beaches of Prince William Sound. What’s more, they found that the crude’s chemical composition had not changed over the years.

Some of the beaches in question, simply do not get the wave action, or ground water discharge to disperse the oil. Others have a composition of a permeable top layer, and a non-permeable lower level, trapping the crude between the layers. As it stands, scientists believe that “letting nature take its course” is the best option, because “Removal of buried oil would likely be more disruptive than beneficial”. Scientists also warn, that a major storm hitting the area, like a once in 100 years type of storm, will release the oil back into the environment.*

*NOAA


Vernal Equinox

March 20 means that spring has sprung, and for Fairbanks, it actually feels like spring on the first day of spring. Alaska, the Yukon and Northwest Territories have all seen record temps the past few days, and all three have seen 70F degrees this month. It is the earliest on record for all of us to hit that mark.

The third, and final Supermoon of the year is also taking place on the first day of spring. This full moon, is also known as the Worm Moon. Not as catchy as the Super Blood Wolf Moon, but as it historically signals when worms start coming out of the frozen earth, I can get into the Worm Moon. Quite honestly, even though this has been an insanely mild winter in the far north, I am more than ready for spring. I only have three salmon fillets left in my freezer.

Goose watching season has also begun here in Fairbanks. Alaskans are easily entertained, so we have an annual bet on when the first Canadian Goose shows up at Creamer’s Field. Whoever guesses the date and time of the first goose landing, without going over, wins $500.

Fairbanks Weather Almanac for March 20:

High temp………………….. +39F
Low temp…………………… +26F

Record high………………… +56F
Record low…………………. -37F

Average high……………….. +28F
Average low………………… – 1F

Sunrise……………………. 7:52am
Sunset…………………….. 8:07pm
Length of day………………. 12 hrs 15 mins
….. For a gain of 6 mins 44 secs from yesterday


Rose Berry Alaska Art Gallery

The Rose Berry Art Gallery is located on the upper floor of the Museum of the North. The Alaska Territorial Legislature included the museum in the charter for the University of Alaska in 1917. The museum had its first exhibit in 1929, a collection of ethnological, archeological and paleontological material that had been collected by the famed local naturalist, Otto Geist. The large brown bear at the entrance to the museum’s Alaska Gallery is named “Otto” in honor of Mr Geist. In 1929, the University’s small collection of paintings were also placed on exhibit.


Warning: Do not touch the bear! I think it’s safe to say the bear’s nose gets rubbed for luck on occasion.

The art gallery is home to 2000 years of Alaskan art, from ancient ivory carvings, to contemporary sculpture and paintings.


“The Muries in Alaska”, oil on canvas by M.C. “Rusty” Heurlin

Artwork by “Rusty” Heurlin is displayed throughout the gallery. Heurlin spent several years living in the bush with his Alaska Native friends. The Muries, subject of the painting above, traveled throughout Alaska by dogsled. Margaret Murie was the first woman to graduate from the University of Alaska.

The gallery has over 3700 works of art on display. The current building was completed in 2005. Prior to that, much of the artwork was not displayed. Even with the new space, the vast majority of the collection is not on display. The Archaeology Collection alone has over 750,000 artifacts.

The work ranges from photographs by Ansel Admas, a painting of Denali by Sidney Laurence, to sculptures including the two thousand year old Okvik Madonna which originated in the Bering Sea region.


Walk to the River

In addition to paintings of wooly mammoths, there is a large selection of contemporary art as well. One of the most prominent is a rather large and elaborate outhouse. I did not take a picture of the impressive throne, but I did check to see if it was authentic. It was; it had a styrofoam seat. I did not check to see if it had been used recently.

Admission to the art gallery comes with admission to the museum. Don’t forget to check out the Place Where You Go to Listen. An “ever changing musical ecosystem, giving voice to the darkness, daylight, phases of the moon, seismic activity of the earth, and the dance of the aurora borealis”. It is honestly, quite the experience.