Tag Archives: volcano

Bogoslof


Bogoslof volcano, as seen from a satellite image, 18 minutes after the start of the eruption 5.28.17

Bogoslof once again went red on Monday morning at 10am. The ash plume extended to 32,000′. The ash cloud from the above photo, from a May eruption, rose to over 40,000′. Since December, Bogoslof has erupted 60 times.

Photo credit: AVO/Dave Schneider


Alaska Volcanoes

Bogoslof by USCG
Bogoslof’s eruption of 23 December 2016. Photo credit: Crew of USCG Cutter Alex Haley

With Bogoslof being as active as it has been recently, there has been an increase in interest regarding Alaska’s many volcanoes. Since mid December, Bogoslof has erupted ten times.

Bogoslof plume
Plume from the eruption of Bogoslof on 20 December. Photo credit: Paul Tuvman/AVO

According to Alaska Volcano Observatory, which is a joint program by the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Alaska – Fairbanks, Alaska has 90 volcanoes that have erupted in the past 10,000 years – and could erupt again. Of those 90, 50 have erupted since records started being kept in 1760.

Unlike volcanoes in Hawaii, which tend to ooze lava, Alaska volcanoes usually explode, sending ash as high as 50,000 feet in the air. Airlines get anxious when ash gets above 20,000 feet, and Bogoslof has consistently sent plumes into the 35,000′ range.

FAA estimates that roughly 80,000 large aircraft fly downwind of the Aleutian volcanoes yearly, with 30,000 people doing so every day. When Redoubt erupted in 1989, a KLM jet, which was 150 miles away, flew through Redoubt’s ash path. The jet lost all four engines with 231 people on board. The aircraft had dropped two miles, down to just over 13,000 feet, when the crew managed to restart the engines, and safely land in Anchorage.

Bogoslof change
Changes in Bogoslof Island with the recent eruptions. Credit: USGS/AVO

Photos and statistics come courtesy of AVO and their website. A special shoutout to the USCG Cutter Alex Haley: Nice photo, I hope its inclusion in the post is acceptable.


Bogoslof erupts unexpectedly

bogoslof island
Bogoslof Island

The submarine volcano at Bogoslof Island in the Aleutian Chain has gone Red twice in two days. An ash plume was sent up 34,000 feet on Wednesday, causing some concern for passing aircraft.

Bogoslof Island was first mapped after it’s eruption in 1796. The 173 acre island has seen six eruptions since then, from various vents. The island rises to 490′ above sea level, but approximately 6000′ from the seabed.

Castle Rock
Castle Rock on Bogoslof Island; Photo credit: Ann Harding/AVO

“Castle Rock”, as seen above, is the eroded remnant of a dome from the 1796 eruption. Currently, AVO has downgraded the alert level to Orange.


Explosion under Cleveland 

Photo credit: AVO

An explosion was heard from the Cleveland Volcano by residents in the village of Nikolski.

The 5676′ active volcano is on Chuginadak Island, which lies 940 miles southwest of Anchorage. The alert level on Cleveland was subsequently raised from yellow to orange.

Cleveland, named after former U.S. President Grover Cleveland, is one of Alaska’s most active volcanos.

Meanwhile, in Ohio, the Cleveland Indians exploded for 6 runs in a shutout win over the Chicago Cubs.  Coincidence?


Katmai Bear Cam

Brooks Falls in Katmai
Brown bears fishing at Brooks Falls in Katmai National Park

The Katmai National Park Bear Cam is back up and running for the season. The camera overlooks Brooks Falls in the park, where the bears congregate to fish the salmon run.

The 6395 square mile park was established as a National Monument in 1918. Located on the Pacific side of the Alaska Peninsula, Katmai is home to approximately 2200 brown bears. It is considered to be one of the Seven Wildlife Wonders of the World.

The Bear Cam has once again been set up by explore.org. The link is below.

http://explore.org/live-cams/player/brown-bear-salmon-cam-brooks-falls


Pavlov goes Red

Pavlof erupts Easter 2016
Photo credit: AVO/Colt Snapp

Pavlof Volcano out on the Aleutian Chain erupted on Easter Sunday, sending a plume of ash over 20,000 feet into the air. Pavlov is Alaska’s second most active volcano, erupting 40 times during recorded history.

A passenger on a PenAir flight out to Dutch Harbor caught the very cool image above.

The alert level for Pavlov now stands at “Red”.


Chile & Everest

Two acts of Earth’s power was caught on camera recently:

A hiker in Chile was filming a waterfall in Llianquihue National Reserve, when the Calbuco volcano erupted on 22 April. The last time Calbuco erupted was in 1973. The ash plume was sent over 1000 m into the air.

Calbuco erupts
The eruption of Chile’s Calbuco. Photo credit: David Cortes Serey/AFP/Getty Images

———————————————————————————-

A German climber, Josh Kobusch, was on Mt Everest when the 7.8 magnitude Nepal earthquake struck, triggering an avalanche which roared into the Everest Basecamp on Saturday. Kobusch’s footage of the avalanche is the first to come off of the mountain. At least 18 people died on Everest from the avalanche and over 3300 people have died due to the earthquake overall.

The 7.8 quake was the worst to hit Nepal since the 8.0 that struck in 1934, which all but wiped out the cities of Kathmandu, Bhaktapur and Patan.

Nepal Earthquake
Destruction from the 7.8 earthquake in Bhaktapur, Nepal. Photo credit:REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar