Tag Archives: moose

Alaska Covid-19 Restrictions

Courtesy of The Onion:

  • Preventing people from dying alone 5,000 miles away from anyone who loves them would defeat the entire purpose of Alaska.
  • Residents advised against pulling down their mask to say, “Hey, there’s a moose” every time they see a moose.
  • Visitors must quarantine for 14 days in the Alaskan wilderness with nothing but a pocket knife and a frying pan.

There was a state by state slideshow on their site. I admit to only looking at Alaska’s, because it was only two slides into the presentation. I am a fan of alphabetical order. Link to the entire slideshow can be found below:

https://www.theonion.com/state-by-state-covid-19-restrictions-1845906521


#OptOutside 2020

Proper wildlife distancing, courtesy of National Park Service

With the pandemic encouraging many of us to put off large Thanksgiving gatherings this year, and foregoing the annual insanity of “Black Friday” (an event I honestly have never understood), there remains the opportunity to explore the outdoors.

The current situation is what it is, and we are stuck with it. For the moment, at least. Now, more than ever, why not opt to head outside? Social distancing is a lot easier to accomplish, and it’s good from time to time to remind ourselves that we are still a part of the natural world.

So try to spend some time outside this weekend, but remember to keep your proper wildlife distance.


Moose joins soccer match in Homer

A moose jumped a fence to join in on a pick up soccer match in Homer, Alaska. The moose appears to be a bit of a ball hog, but I was disappointed when the other players chose not to pass the ball back to the moose. I wouldn’t have been able to resist.

Another view, complete with commentary

Welcome to Alaska, Gunner.


Moose Crossing

Guest Photographer:

Photo credit: NMT

Driving into Denali National Park one day this August, we were forced to stop for one of the locals. I love how small that car looks.

P.S. Roof top tent


Autumnal Equinox

The peak has passed in the Interior

It’s the first day of autumn in the Northern Hemisphere, although to be perfectly honest, we are well underway up here in Interior Alaska. The colors have definitely peaked already, and over half of the leaves are now on the ground.

I had an unscheduled day off on Monday. A job cancelled on Friday, and there wasn’t enough time, or ambition, to schedule something else in its place. It’s unusual for me to get a nice day on an unscheduled day off, and Monday was an absolutely beautiful fall day up here.

So I spent the afternoon hiking the seemingly, endless system of trails that start at my deck. I saw only one other person and her dog at the start of the hike, and after that it was only the grouse, red squirrels, a couple of moose and myself.

The woods were mostly silent, with only the occasional scolding from a squirrel, or the pre-flush clucking of a grouse. Even the trail, loaded with a carpet of leaves, allowed me to pass with barely a sound: Only a faint rustling was left in my wake.


Season of the Moose

Tundra, by Chad Carpenter


Toad River

A Pandemic Roadtrip: Part Five

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Looking out my cabin door; Toad River Lodge

I pushed the mileage to just under 650 on this day, getting to Toad River at around 8pm.  A shortcut on Highway 29 meant that I could avoid Fort St John, but there was a major construction project on 29, so I doubt it cut off much time.  Still, it was a highway I had not driven previously, and it’s always good to get in some new territory.

Overall, this part of B.C. is just stunning country, and there was wildlife galore.  Black bears and bison, for the most part, but I did see a couple of moose.

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Inside the Toad River Lodge: They collect hats.

My usual layover in this part of British Columbia is at the Toad River Lodge, and I swung in here once again.  I’ve written about this lodge on here before, but I can offer a quick refresher.  On my second drive to Alaska, I was driving a slightly older Chevy pickup, pulling a UHaul trailer.  I don’t believe I had anything in the trailer, it was full of stuff a buddy of mine talked me into hauling up for him. I did make use of the trailer roof though.  I pulled into the Toad River Lodge on that trek to Alaska, and watched a single engine aircraft land alongside the Alaska Highway, and then promptly taxi down the highway, where it pulled in front of the Toad River Lodge.  They landed for some breakfast.  I knew this was my kind of country at that moment.

They are currently doing a lot of work to the lodge.  The old, and probably original cabin I stayed at, is no longer standing.  Several new cabins, with running water even, now stand along the lake shore.  I rented one of those new, fangled cabins for the night.  Not as cozy, and without a bit of atmosphere, but I had a sound night of sleep.

 


Roadtrip Wildlife

A Pandemic Roadtrip: Day Four

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Prairie Dog on high alert

The fourth day of the drive back to Alaska took me to McLeod Lake on the famed Fraser River of British Columbia.

I was starting to see more wildlife now, and that always adds to the drive for me.  I was woefully unprepared for wildlife photography however, with a cell phone and the 120 shooter, a Kodak 66.  I made do, as best I could.

The first real sighting in BC was a moose.  I did not stop for a moose, nor did I later stop for a caribou.  I see them all the time, as it is.

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One of many black bear

I do not normally see a lot of black bear in Alaska, so I stopped to take pictures of a couple of them.  In all, black bear ruled the animal sighting roost: I spotted 17 along the road, all eating the lush grass, like the one in the picture.

This picture came about, mainly because I had spotted a lynx, which is an incredibly rare sighting along a road.  I hit reverse, but by the time I came to where I had seen the wary cat, it had made its way to the tree line.  Just 100 yards further on, was this black bear.  I hadn’t even made it out of second gear yet, so it didn’t take a lot of effort on my part to slow for it.

A pair of bison

Further on down the road, I came across a pair of bison. I would go on to spot several on this day. They really are magnificent beasts.

I did not see my first grizzly until the final day of my drive, after crossing into Alaska. It was a sow and her cub. The cub was absolutely adorable, as it stood on its hind legs in order to get a better look at me, or maybe my car. I did slow down in order to attempt to get a picture, but that action seemed to intrigue the mother a tad too much. She started to trot right over to my car, leaving her cub standing on the opposite shoulder. Since I was in a car that sat lower than she stood, and I had an open window for a clear view, I decided the picture wasn’t that important and released the clutch to move forward. The sow continued to trot, and I proceeded to engage second gear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Alaska Roundup

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Naknek River; Camera: Leica M3, Film: Fujichrome Velvia 100

The North Slope village of Utqiagvik woke up to -20F degree temperatures on Wednesday morning.  That was a record low for the day for the village.  It was Utqiagvik’s first recording of a record low since 21 December 2007.  During that same time span, the village had set or tied 112 record high temperatures.

 

Alaska has started to “reopen” businesses throughout the state, with everyone seemingly holding their breath as it happens.  Travel restrictions into the state remain in place.  Restaurants are now able to seat to within 25% of capacity, and members at a table are supposed to be from the same household.

The Fairbanks Borough had seen two weeks go by without a new case of Covid-19, but that ended on Sunday with a case in North Pole.  Since then, North Pole has seen another diagnosed case.  The State had six new cases on Tuesday, for a total of 351.  228 individuals have recovered from Covid-19, and nine Alaskans have died from the virus.  Concerning, to me at least, is the first recorded cases in small, isolated, communities like Kodiak, Petersburg and Sitka after a long period of social distancing.

Fishing communities are still struggling with what to do for the summer season.  Valdez has decided to allow fishermen into town without any quarantine, where several smaller communities are demanding a quarantine.  The State of Alaska has agreed to allow fishermen to quarantine on their boats, although a realistic plan for that option remains elusive, considering most fly into these small communities, and air travel between towns not on the road system is off limits.  Travel between communities on the road system is now being allowed.

 

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Denali, and the Alaska Range

Tourism is all but scrapped for the 2020 season.  The two main cruise ship companies have written off Alaska for the year, and have even decided to keep their lodges and hotels closed until late spring 2021.

Denali National Park has now opened the Park Road to Mile 12.  As spring takes a stronger grip on the land, the Park will continue to open up more of the road as conditions allow.  Denali Park is also considering having additional road lotteries in 2020.  The lottery, which allows permit holders to drive well into the Park, where usually only busses are allowed, takes place in September.  Additional opportunities would be extremely welcome.  I’m thrilled with the idea, since the State is all but closed to Outside tourists this year.

No offense.

 

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Moose Crossing: Denali Highway at Tangle River

The Denali Highway, not to be confused with the Denali Park Road, is NOT open.  Yet, people keep getting stuck on the road between Cantwell and Paxson.  The Denali Highway, possibly the best drive in Alaska, is not maintained during the winter.  It is also not paved, which keeps the riffraff numbers down.  Or at least, the tour busses.

 


Moose

Alaska’s Big Five:

Moose (Alces alces), is the largest of the deer family, and the Alaska-Yukon subspecies (Alces alces gigas), is the largest of moose.

A small adult female may weigh 800 pounds, while a large adult male can reach double that at 1600 pounds.  Calves are born in the spring, with single births being the majority, but twins are common.  Calves weigh a mere 28-30 pounds at birth, but within 5 months they will often be pushing 300 pounds.  A moose rarely lives to the age of 16 years in the wild.

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There are roughly 200,000 moose distributed widely throughout Alaska.  On average, 7000 moose are harvested during the hunting season, providing 3.5 million pounds of meat.

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