Tag Archives: Seward

Watch the Arms

Seward, Alaska

A low-keyed eyeballing

Life at the Alaska SeaLife Center


Bear Glacier

Bear Glacier of Resurrection Bay


Back to Exit

Exit Glacier; Seward, Alaska

On what has become an annual visit, I swung by Exit Glacier with some visitors last week. The picture was taken from where the foot of the glacier stood in 2010.


Fishing Resurrection Bay


Stud Puffin

Alaska SeaLife Center


“Words of advice and caution”

Considering a trip to Alaska?

Resurrection Bay

“If you are old, go by all means, but if you are young, wait. The scenery of Alaska is much grander than anything else of its kind in the world, and it is not wise to dull one’s capacity for enjoyment by seeing the finest first”

— Henry Gannett

The Harriman Alaska Series

Bear Glacier

“If you are old and want to see the finest scenery in the world, there’s no time like the present. And if you are young, what are you waiting for? Check the ferry timetable, grab a sleeping bag, and go. Stay for a while. Believe me, it could be the event of a lifetime.”

— Mark Adams

Tip of the Iceberg

My little corner of Alaska

On a personal note: I took the second quote’s advice, loading my Labrador Retriever, camping gear and typewriter into a 1974 Ford Bronco, drove across half of the northern U.S, and took the ferry from Bellingham, WA through the Inside Passage to Haines, Alaska, and stayed a while…

In fact, today is the anniversary of my arrival to the State of Alaska.

It has been several events of a lifetime. With a little luck, I expect to have one or two more.

Cheers!


Resurrection Bay in B&W

Sailboat heading out to the gulf

Fishing for pinks at the mouth of Lowell Creek

Abandoned pier

Camera: Agfa Billy-Clack 74; Film: Kodak 120 TMax 100


Curatores Gignentia

The beaver at midnight

When I first set up the Beaver Cam, I was expecting some photos right away, but the Beav had other ideas. It didn’t come by the cam until I was out of town fishing. It does have an extensive area from which to fell his lumber, so I didn’t get too concerned.

That Pesky Rabbit; or Curatores Gignentia in Latin

The first week the Beaver Cam was up, I had 442 pictures of this rabbit. I’ve been asked, “How can you be sure it’s the same rabbit?” Because I waded through 442 pictures of the goofy thing hoping for a picture of the beaver.

The Bunny Hop

The funny thing about rabbits, is that they tend to twitch this way, and then twitch that way for endless hours of viewing entertainment. They may hop a foot or two, but then they go back to twitching. There were a lot of pictures where the only noticeable difference between shots was the placement of one ear or the other.

The rabbit returns to twitching

The second week the cam was up, when I was out of town chasing cohos, the beaver did stop by for a couple of dozen shots. I was grateful, although they were interspersed between 502 pictures of my favorite rabbit. When I finally took the cam down due to concern it may be carried off with a tree, I had close to 1000 pictures of Bugs, and 40 of the beaver.

Oh, and four pictures of Moose Legs:

Moose Legs, just to spice things up


Miller’s Landing

Seward, Alaska; Camera: Agfa Billy-Clack, Film: Kodak 120 T-Max 100

I’ve had this Agfa Billy-Clack #74 camera sitting on the shelf for a while now, but had never sent a roll of film through it.

The Billy-Clack was produced prior to The Second World War, so it’s an 80+ year old piece of equipment. I believe the exact years of production ran from 1934 to 1940.

I had no idea what I was going to get out of it, but I kind of like the results. I shot a roll of black & white film while in Seward, and followed that up with a roll of color in Fairbanks.

The Agfa Billy-Clack #74

The Billy-Clack has a definite “Art-Deco” look to it. The camera itself is as basic as one can get. It has the option of two shutter speeds (1/50, Bulb), three apertures (11,16,22), two view finders (a portrait, and a landscape), and it does have a built in yellow filter that you can slide in place if you so desire. It also has one of the most awkward shutters I have ever used. Still, it was fun to get out and shoot.

Fisherman at Miller’s Landing; Camera: Agfa Billy-Clack, Film: Kodak 120 T-Max 100