Tag Archives: beaver

An actual thunderstorm

Image from the National Weather Service – Fairbanks

An honest to goodness thunderstorm is rather rare in Alaska. We get lightning by the bolt load, but nothing like a midwestern U.S. hill shaker. We just do not have the humidity to drive impressive, tornado birthing, cells. Still, what developed just across the northern bank of the Yukon River near Beaver, AK actually brought out the official Severe Thunderstorm Warning call from the Fairbanks office of the National Weather Service on Wednesday evening.

It was noted that it has been over two years since the NWS from Anchorage or Juneau has issued such a warning. Who knew such competition existed within the NWS?

Definitely not a normal occurrence.

On another note: Last night was the final night of the year for a post midnight sunset in Fairbanks. Summer is going by so fast.


The stream less traveled

Nuggets by Jamie Smith


Welcome Back

Film Friday:

Ducks, geese, swans and cranes have all come back to the neighborhood. The back pond still has ice, although it’s looking more than a bit dodgy and should go out this weekend. The beaver is patrolling the edges, occasionally flushing a pair of mallards from the open water to the ice, where they stand patiently waiting for the open water to be beaver free. Even the gulls are back, swooping low over the pond’s edge looking for the perfect nesting spot.

Spring has indeed arrived in the Far North.

Camera: Leica M3; Film: Kodak 35mm, Ektar100


Beaver trails in the snow

Beaver trail

This past weekend, a surprisingly large section of open water showed itself on The Pond. A steady stream of bubbles came up to the water’s surface. The bubbles were methane escaping the mud below.

The next morning, the temp at the cabin was -27F, so at ice level it was easily -30F. Much of the open area had frozen over, but a neat circular hole remained in the ice. From the hole, a trail led off across the pond’s snowy surface. One of the resident beavers had come out to explore the area. It followed all of the trails we made in the snow the previous day, and then it went off on its own, exploring at its leisure.

Beaver tunnel

There were several times, where the trail dipped below the snow, and the beaver tunneled for quite a distance, before popping up again to the surface. I had never seen where a beaver had gone swimming in the snow. Most of these tunnels were near the cat tail stands, but not all.

The day after I followed the beaver trail, the open water had completely closed over. The methane is the clear culprit in the open water, especially such a large opening. As the bubbles rise to the surface, the ice thins due to the movement of the water. Most of the methane pocket locations are known, and those areas are avoided when anyone traverses The Pond. We are guessing that this opening was caused by a large, unknown pocket, that gave way. The bubbles that we watched coming up were in three distinct trails, but we wondered if the beaver had helped things along. Surely, the beaver knew about the location of the thinning ice, and kept one section open longer than the rest. Did their movement below, open up the large section we found? The beaver is an intriguing species of rodent.


One Year on a Beaver Dam

From Voyaguers Wolf Project; Voyaguers National Park

Voyaguers Wolf Project placed a camera trap on one end of a beaver dam near Voyaguers National Park in Northern Minnesota. This six minute video shows the variety of wildlife that made use of the beaver’s bridge to cross the pond.


My neighbor with lakefront property

Film Friday:

The Beaver in warmer days

Camera: Minolta SRT201; Film: Kodak 35mm, Tri-X400


Beaver Lodge

The beaver lodge and pantry

The lodge has grown some since last year, and this year’s collection of birch, aspen and willow branches is larger than the previous year. As far as I know, there are still three beavers in the lodge, although I have not seen the kit in several months.

The beavers really kick into food gathering gear in September. From that time on, there is seldom any time of the day, when one, if not both beavers, are collecting trees and branches. It becomes an evening event, to watch the large rodents swim across The Pond, with the tree branches in tow. When they reach their food pile, they dive underneath the pile, trapping the freshly collected branches at the bottom of the pile. The Pond and its ice will soon become a giant tupperware container.

One of many beaver trails

The beavers have branched out, going further and further from the lodge to collect saplings. The yard, and I use that term loosely, was fenced when they first showed up. The beavers have now worked their way to the very edge of that fencing. For now, there is a reprieve. The Pond has iced over, and the beavers will cut back on their tree cutting. The ice should now be in place until spring, and the beavers will spend most of their time in the lodge, venturing out under water to their pantry for meals.


The Beaver Cam

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I recently pulled the SD card from the trail camera that I have looking out over the beaver lodge.  It had 747 images on it.

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741 of the images were of ducks.  Sometimes in pairs, sometimes solo, sometimes the ducks had a large party and ignored all social distancing.  I have ducks swimming, ducks scratching an itch (like above), ducks taking off in flight, and ducks preening for the camera.

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There are four images that contain at least one duck and one beaver.  The beavers are quite active, but have not been overwhelmed by the urge to cut down any trees.  They seem to continue to eat on the supply they cut down late last summer and early autumn.

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There are only two images of a beaver without the photobombing ducks.  Personally, I think the Beaver Cam has gone to the beavers’ heads.  Now they just slap their tail in order to get attention.  Once you start to ignore their swimming about, the aggrieved beaver fires off a tail slap.  Who knew beavers to be such prima donnas?

The big male seems to have grown quite a bit since he last showed himself.  The female remains in shape; she’s quite svelte in appearance.  There is at least one kit, that I have seen.  There certainly could be two, but only one has shown itself at a time.


Fairbanks Roundup

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Lots of sun, no sign of ice, but plenty of beaver sign

Summer.  The residents of Interior Alaska live for Alaskan summers.  The difference from winter to summer is extreme.

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Aurora Forecast; Map credit Climatologist Brian Brettschneider

The Aurora viewing season officially came to an end on Sunday.  We have too much daylight, and will not have a chance to see the Northern Lights for 91 days.

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Credit: National Weather Service – Fairbanks

On May 15th, Fairbanks went into our summer period of civil twilight.  We have enough natural light to partake in outdoor activities 24/7.

May 18th is the average date for the final freeze of the spring months in Fairbanks.

From May 29th, until July 14th, the sun will set after midnight.

The Summer Solstice, Fairbanks’ favorite day, is on June 20th.

Night in Fairbanks will turn dark again on September 4th.  A sad day indeed.


Fairbanks and Covid-19; So far…

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The Carlson Center: Home of the Alaska Nanooks

The ice hockey arena, where the University of Alaska Nanooks play their home games, was recently converted to an overflow, field hospital.  The arena adds 100 beds at the moment, to the 38 beds at Fairbanks Memorial Hospital set aside for Corvid-19 patients, and the 26 beds in the intensive care unit.  Like every community around the globe, everyone here hopes the arena beds are never used.

Alaska had 13 new Covid-19 cases on Wednesday.  The state total was now at 226 cases, still the lowest of every U.S. state, but our population is also among the lowest.  27 Alaska residents have been hospitalized, and the state has seen seven deaths, with two of those deaths taking place Outside.

Fairbanks had six of those new cases, for a total of 71 in the Fairbanks North Star Borough.

The city of Dillingham, Alaska and the Curyung Tribal Council recently sent a request to the governor to close the Bristol Bay commercial fishery.  That was huge news in Alaska.  Bristol Bay is the largest sockeye salmon fishery in the world.  Both entities told the State of Alaska that there was no way to limit the small communities exposure to the virus, and the communities lack the health care resources to handle a pandemic.  Tens of thousands of fishermen and fish processors will soon start their migration into the region, as we get closer to the fishing season.  There has been no official response from the State of Alaska, although fishery workers are considered “essential” by the State.

Conoco Phillips, the oil field giant, has shut down its remote North Slope oil fields, and have placed them into long-term storage due to coronavirus concerns.  A BP worker at Prudhoe Bay had recently been diagnosed with the disease, putting several workers in quarantine.

Travel to Alaska by nonresidents is obviously frowned upon.  Visitors are expected to quarantine for 14 days if they do arrive in the state.  The cruise ship industry will not be visiting Alaskan ports until July at the earliest.  Alaska has little, to no say in that.  All Canadian ports of call are closed until July 1.  An intriguing maritime law prohibits international cruise ships from carrying U.S. citizens from one U.S. port to another.  In other words, they can not go from Seattle, Washington to Skagway, Alaska without a stop at a foreign port – namely a Canadian port.  Until Canada opens its ports, Alaskan ports will remain closed to the cruising industry.


Personal note:

Several blogs that I follow have asked the question: “What is the proper way to blog during this event?”  A few have even stopped blogging altogether.  I honestly don’t have an answer.  I rarely spend much time worrying about proper, so I’m probably not the guy to ask.  As for Circle to Circle, I don’t intend to ignore the current situation, but I’m not going to dwell on it either.  Every post will not be Covid-19 related, but that doesn’t mean I’m not paying attention to world events or that I’m not sympathetic to the suffering and losses.  It isn’t hard for me to get as much coverage as I want on the Covid-19 virus, the difficulty is in limiting it to a manageable amount.  One can quickly get overwhelmed, and then it’s hard to pull back out of the funk.

For now, I will continue to do what I do here, which is mainly to blog about Alaska, and its wonderful quirks.  Circle to Circle started out to chronicle a long trip, and I still think it’s at it’s best when I’m writing about traveling.  Travel will have to stay close to Fairbanks for the foreseeable future, so maybe I can pull some rabbits out of the local hat.

I sincerely think it’s important to remember that there are a lot of beautiful things happening every day out there, among the chaos and uncertainty.  Maybe now, more than ever, it is worthwhile to point those things out as they happen.  The moose cows will give birth this spring, and I will have little, gangly moose calves wandering about in short order.  The sandhill cranes will soon be flying into the region, bugling their ancient call from the skies and tundra.  The puddles and ponds will be full of ducks and muskrats, and the beaver will emerge from their domed hut – hopefully with kits.

Everything changes, and, of course, this blog can change at the drop of a wood duck chick.  This was/is always going to be a work in progress.  Stop by for a virtual Alaskan break, if that pleases you; feel free to fly over, if you feel Circle to Circle is not your pint of choice.  Ask questions, leave comments, drop me a line if you’d like.  We are all in this together, even as we stay apart.

Stay safe, and keep your distance.