Tag Archives: quote

Year’s End

“Year’s end is neither an end nor a beginning but a going on, with all the wisdom that experience can instill in us.”
—Hal Borland


The Apache Trail

“The Apache Trail combines the grandeur of the Alps, the glory of the Rockies, the magnificence of the Grand Canyon and then adds an indefinable something that none of the others have. To me, it is the most awe-inspiring and most sublimely beautiful panorama nature has ever created.”
— Theodore Roosevelt


Map of the Apache Trail

We headed for Apache Junction to pick up the start of the Apache Trail. Long used by the Apache Indians, the trail became a stagecoach route through the Superstition Mountains in the 1800’s. Today, the route from Apache Junction is officially known as State Route 88.

Goldfield


Mammoth Saloon in Goldfield

The first stop on the trail is the old Ghost Town of Goldfield. In 1890, Goldfield was booming, with three saloons, a brewery, blacksmith, general store, meat market and a boarding house. Once thought to overtake the town of Mesa in population, the mine’s vein suddenly faulted, and the ore quality dropped. From there, the town withered in the desert.


Goldfield’s bordello

Today, you can tour the played out Mammoth Mine, ride the narrow gauge train, eat outside the cafe, or have a cold beer and meal in the saloon. I will say that the ice cream cones are damn good, especially when the waffle cones are fresh out of the oven.


Canyon Lake

The first reservoir on the Salt River is Canyon Lake, which was formed after the building of the Mormon Flat Dam in 1925. Steamboat rides are offered on the lake, and hiking trails abound.

Tortilla Flat: Population 6


Superstition Saloon in Tortilla Flat

We stopped in Tortilla Flat, for what I hoped would be lunch, but it turned out that I was the only one hungry, so we only looked around. I heard the food in the saloon was the best in town, but even that did not convince the relatives.


Inside the Superstition Saloon

The saloon boasted one dollar bills as wallpaper, and bar stools that were actual saddles.

The trail gets interesting

The trail turns to gravel once you travel past Tortilla Flat. Gravel may be a generous term, silt may be more accurate. Either way, I had a blast. The road is a switch-backing, sandy, twisting bundle of pure overland fun.

Apache Lake


Apache Lake

Apache Lake is the next reservoir. The lake is formed by the Horse Mesa Dam, which was completed in 1927. It’s a lake I’d like to come back and explore. The fishing is suppose to be great, and the access restricting. Perfect.

Roosevelt Dam

The 357′ Roosevelt Dam was built between 1905-1911, and raised 77′ in 1989. The addition increased the storage capacity of Roosevelt Lake by 20%. 42 lives were lost building the dam.


Theodore Roosevelt Bridge

Highway 188 used to cross the river over the dam. With the ambitious remodel, the highway was realigned over the newly built Theodore Roosevelt Bridge.

From the bridge, the Apache Trail officially ends. To complete the loop back to Apache Junction, head towards the town of Globe.

Tonto National Monument


The view from Tonto Cliff Dwelling

The Tonto National Monument is on the opposite side of the highway from Roosevelt Lake. The cliff dwellings of the Salado people are the main attraction. More on these in a future post.


Tonto NM cliff dwellings

Globe, AZ

I had heard that the Burger House in Miami was well worth the stop, but I also heard that it was incredibly popular, and I was starving and didn’t want to risk a line. We swung into Globe instead and ate at Nurdberger. The small cafe did not disappoint. Worth the stop, after a day on the trail.


Fats

Pioneer rock & roller, Antoine “Fats” Domino Jr has died. From 1950 through the early 1960’s, Domino had over three dozen Top 40 hits, 23 gold records, and sold over 65 million singles.
The New Orleans artist, with his Cajun accent and boogie-woogie piano, had a style all his own. Elvis Presley once said, ” …Rock ’n’ roll was here a long time before I came along. Let’s face it: I can’t sing it like Fats Domino can. I know that.”

Domino was 89.


Fats playing the Carib Theatre, Kingston in 1961


Rest in peace, Gwen

Gwen Ifill

“We can’t expect the world to get better by itself, we have to create something we can leave the next generation.”
— Gwen Ifill


Revisit: Manatee Springs

Kayak at Manatee Springs
A kayaker paddling up to the Springs

A quote I found posted at the Springs:

“Having borrowed a canoe from some Indians, I visited a very great and most beautiful fountain or spring which boils up from between the hills about 300 yards from the river, throwing up great quantities of white small pieces of shells and white shell rock which, glittering through the limped eliment as they rise to the surface, subside and fall again round about on every side.
The bason of the fountain is nearly round and about 100 yards in circumferance. The banks round about of a moderate steep assent cover’d with broken white shell and the water gradually deepns to the center of the fountain, where it is many fathoms deep. The fountain is full of fish and alegators and at great depth in the water appear as plain as if they were close at hand.
The creek that runs from this immence fountain is above twenty yards wide and runs very swift into the river, carying its sea green transparent waters near 100 yards a cross the river, the depth of the water of the creek 10 of 12 feets—where we see a continual concourse of fish of various kinds such as garr, catfish, mullet, trout, bream of various species, silverfish and pike, and the monstrous amphabious maneta: A skeleton of which I saw on the bank of the spring, which the Indians had lately killed.
The hills that nearly incompassed the spring were about 15 or 20 yards in height next the river but the land falls away considerably from the top of the hills and becomes a lower flat or nearly levell forest of pine, oak, bay, magnolia, and cabbage trees. The soil of the hills a loose greyish sandy mold on shelly and limestone rocks. The water of the spring cool and agreeable to drink. The Indians and traders say this fountain vents the waters of the Great Alatchua Savanah.
—William Bartram, July 1774


What one yearns for…

…when doing a roof job in 90 degree temps.

Adventure Word Porn

Courtesy of wordporn.com


Yukon Time

Whitehorse Rapids
Whitehorse Rapids, Yukon River circa 1898

“Geography has kept the Yukon to a slower pace, so that if I wasn’t exactly traveling backward in time, I often had the illusion of drifting more slowly in the present.”
—John Hildebrand – “Reading the River”