Tag Archives: new york

Maison a Machicoulis

The French Castle; Fort Niagara

Camera: Leica M3; Film: Kodak 35mm, Tri-X400


A path to be traveled

A few more images from my time exploring Fort Niagara.

Camera: Leica M3; Film: Kodak 35mm, Tri-X400


Porte des Cinq Nations

The French named this gate “Gate of the Five Nations” in honor of the Iroquois Confederacy

Fort Niagara’s main gate.

Camera: Leica M3; Film: Kodak 35, Tri-X400


Father Millet Cross

In the winter of 1687, the men stationed at Fort Niagara were overwhelmed by disease and starvation. Of the 100 men stationed at the garrison, only 12 would survive that brutal winter.

Father Pierre Millet, a Jesuit missionary, was a member of the rescue party that arrived at the fort in the spring of 1688. Father Millet erected an 18 foot wooden cross in honor of the men who perished.

In 1825, President Calvin Coolidge named the 18 square foot section surrounding the cross a national monument. It was the smallest national monument ever named in the U.S.. At the monument dedication, the original wooden cross was replaced by a bronze version, which still stands in its place.

In 1949, monument status was abolished by Congress, and the memorial was transferred to the State of New York, to be a part of Fort Niagara State Park.

Camera: Leica M3; Film: Kodak 35mm, Tri-X400


Guns of Fort Niagara

Musket demonstration

Cannon overlooking the Niagara River

Camera: Leica M3; Film: Kodak Tri-X 400


Panorama of Fort Niagara

The layout of Fort Niagara

Camera: Widelux FVI; Film: Kodak 35mm, TMax100


Fort Niagara via Widelux

The view from the wall

On my last visit to the east coast, I drove out to Fort Niagara, which overlooks the mouth of the Niagara River. I have already written about the historic fort in a previous post.

I brought my Widelux panoramic camera along for the visit, and I have a few photos that I thought I’d share. The scans turned out okay, but I have to say I really like the massive 4″x12″ prints.

The French Castle

Camera: Widelux FVI; Film: Kodak 35mm, TMax100


Robert Frank

Ordinary people, doing ordinary things…

Robert Frank, in his New York home; Photograph by Allen Ginsberg

In 1954, Robert Frank set off across the United States in a used Ford with his Leica camera. He had the idea of photographing America as it unfolded before his eyes. He spent two years on the journey, shooting 767 rolls of film, for over 28,000 shots.

83 of those shots would end up in the book “The Americans”.

Image: “Trolley – New Orleans” 1955, photo by Robert Frank

The Americans was first published in 1959, and it took the photography world by storm. The images were honest and gritty, and most of all raw. It was a masterwork of street photography.

US 285 – New Mexico 1956; photo by Robert Frank

Initially, it did not go over well. America was high on the post war 1950’s. Images showing that not everyone in the country had achieved the “American Dream” were not what the public was shouting for. The book went out of publication after only 1100 being printed.

Rodeo – New York City 1955; photo by Robert Frank

History has been kinder. The Americans has seen several reprints, and few photo books have had as large an influence on contemporary photography.

Frank would go on to make fifty documentary films, but he never abandoned still photography.

Map of Robert Frank’s photo trek

Robert Frank died on Monday; he was 94.


Niagara River

City of Niagara from Goat Island; Camera: Leica M3, Film: Kodak 35mm Ektar 100


Dry docked

Sitting high along the Erie Canal; Camera: Leica M3, Film: Kodak 35mm Ektar 100