Tag Archives: music

Who Loves You Baby?

Eddy “The Chief” Clearwater

Legendary Chicago bluesman, Eddy Clearwater died today. He was 83. Born Edward Harrington in Macon, Mississippi, Eddy moved to Chicago in 1950, taking on the nickname “Guitar Eddy”. His agent suggested Clear Water, playing off of bluesman Muddy Waters. Eventually that morphed into Eddy Clearwater.

Clearwater perfected his own style of Blues, which he called “rock-a-blues”, a mixture of Blues, rock, rockabilly, country and gospel. His music career extended over six decades, and he was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 2016.

I first saw Eddy Clearwater live at a club in Des Moines called “Blues on Grand”. I tell you, it was one hell of a show. Of all the Blues acts I saw in Des Moines, I think Clearwater was my favorite. Eddy was such a showman, and I was mesmerized by his guitar play. Clearwater was self taught, and he played the guitar left-handed and upside down. My buddy who was at Blues on Grand with me said, “Watching him play is giving me a headache!” When Clearwater was on stage, he grabbed your attention, and didn’t let you go until he was done with you.

We sat close to the stage, although at BoG, no one sat very far from it. Just before a break, Clearwater called my buddy and I out from the stage. During the intermission, he came over to us and talked to us like we were old friends. Of course, he gave each of us a guitar pick. To this day, I still have mine; it’s fastened to the dash of my old Land Rover.

Rest in peace, Eddy. You will be dearly missed.


Going on down to Yasgur’s Farm…

Near Bethel, New York:

The Curator and I took a trip over to Woodstock between chasing hockey pucks. The museum at the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts was closed on the day we arrived, but that did not keep us from searching out historical markers, and the like.

We found the Yasgur family home. Max Yasgur, a local dairy farmer, leased out one of his fields for the concert. He received plenty of threats for doing so, including calls to “burn him out” and cries to boycott his milk. Yasgur held to his principles, scolding neighbors for charging concert goers for water.

32 musical acts performed in front of over 400,000 people from August 15-18, 1969. Organizers of the festival told Bethel authorities that they expected 50,000 to show up.

The stage was down in the lower left of the above photo, and the entire hillside was filled with spectators.

The museum and art center seem to be first rate, although it was a cursory glance. Even though that was closed, the trip was still a fun drive through the Catskills and music history.


The Jimi Hendrix set list from Woodstock’s final day


Geneva, NY


The Geneva Opera House

The Curator and I met up with some New York friends to take in a Lyle Lovett concert in Geneva, New York. The show took place in Geneva’s 125 year old opera house. The beautiful venue was packed to the balcony.


Lyle Lovett, photo credit: world wide web

Lovett and Shawn Colvin gave a very good show. The two musicians went back and forth singing their songs, with some spirited discussions between songs. It was obvious that Lovett & Colvin had a lot of history together.


Fats

Pioneer rock & roller, Antoine “Fats” Domino Jr has died. From 1950 through the early 1960’s, Domino had over three dozen Top 40 hits, 23 gold records, and sold over 65 million singles.
The New Orleans artist, with his Cajun accent and boogie-woogie piano, had a style all his own. Elvis Presley once said, ” …Rock ’n’ roll was here a long time before I came along. Let’s face it: I can’t sing it like Fats Domino can. I know that.”

Domino was 89.


Fats playing the Carib Theatre, Kingston in 1961


“Well the good ol’ days may not return…

And the rocks might melt and the sea may burn.”

RIP Traveling Poet


For Ringo:

Happy Birthday Ringo


Come and Go Blues


Gregg Allman at the keyboard and his brother Duane on guitar in 1971

The world has lost another musician and an incredibly unique voice. Gregg Allman, co founder of the Allman Brothers Band has passed away. A band that was constantly tied to tragedy, starting with Duane’s death in 1971 from a motorcycle crash, the Allman Brothers pioneered “southern rock”. It should be noted that the band members themselves tried to distance themselves from that term. “I’d rather be known as a progressive band from the South,” said guitarist Dickie Betts. Their live performances were the best in the business.

Gregg Allman was 69. RIP.